Tribune

  • Six Takeaways From Trump And Zelensky’s Phone Call

    26.09.2019

    Six Takeaways From Trump And Zelensky's Phone Call
    About seven minutes into his July 25 telephone call with Ukrainian leader Volodymyr Zelensky, U.S. President Donald Trump shifted the largely cordial and collegial conversation to a new topic, writes Mike Eckel for rferl.org. “I would like you to do us a favor, though,” Trump said, according to a memorandum of the call released by the White House on September 25. Those 10 words could be the legal linchpin for congressional Democrats now embarking on an impeachment inquiry. And the call contains ...
  • Absolute power, reinforced with the populist slogans, could lead to a shrinking of political freedoms

    11.08.2019

    Absolute power, reinforced with the populist slogans, could lead to a shrinking of political freedoms
    While the vote-counting in Ukraine continues, it is already clear that President Volodymyr Zelensky has secured the power over legislative and, consequently, executive branches of the government. His political force, the Servant of the People party, has won a landslide victory in the snap parliamentary elections on July 21, 2019, losing only 3 out of 24 regions under the party lists and winning enough single-member districts to guarantee a single-party majority, writes Artem Remizov for 4liberty.eu. Indeed, this result is an ...
  • Moscow’s Slow-Motion Ethnic Engineering in Occupied Crimea Accelerating

    09.08.2019

    Moscow’s Slow-Motion Ethnic Engineering in Occupied Crimea Accelerating
    When a government engages in mass murder or forcible deportations, most observers see that as a clear sign of ethnic engineering—even if there are unresolved debates as to whether such actions fall under the terms of the international convention against genocide, writes Paul Goble for jamestown.org. Yet, when the powers that be change the composition of the population of a region by encouraging the emigration of some groups, the immigration of others, or a combination thereof, few see this process for ...
  • Los Angeles Times and Crimea’s “unsettled history”

    30.06.2019

    Los Angeles Times and Crimea’s “unsettled history”
    “Crimea’s history is long and tangled. It is today under Russian control, as it has been — sometimes as an autonomous region, sometimes as a part of the Soviet Union — since 1783”, – writes Jeff Opdyke for the Los Angeles Times. A man who is hard to put a pin in. His Twitter says that he is a “global traveling screenwriter”, his website tells a different story – he is a “geo-political & geo-economic analyst.” Well, at least he ...
  • Kolomoisky and the Holding Company: Combination of the Two

    16.03.2019

    Kolomoisky and the Holding Company: Combination of the Two
    The idea that the Ukrainian runaway oligarch, Igor Kolomoisky, is planning to regain control of the nationalized PrivatBank was in the air for some time now. But until the presidential race for the upcoming elections in Ukraine, it had little substance to it. Today, there are at least three candidates who are in one way or another associated with Kolomoisky – Vladimir Zelensky, Alexander Shevchenko and Yulia Tymoshenko. The ex-Minister of Defense of Ukraine Anatoly Grytsenko was also heard to ...
  • The world’s response to Russia’s aggression has been largely inadequate

    15.03.2019

    The world's response to Russia's aggression has been largely inadequate
    Since February 2014, Russia has been waging an undeclared and unprovoked war on its peaceful neighbor Ukraine. After establishing control of Crimea through its subversive operation and covert military invasion, on 16 March that year, Russia staged a show of “local support” for its land grab by conducting a fake secessionist “referendum” on Ukraine’s territory, write Ariana Gic, Hanna Hopko, and Roman Sohn for euobserver. The illegal “referendum” was just one of Russia’s many tricks to mask its aggression against Ukraine. Moscow’s camouflage also ...
  • Quenching Fire with Gasoline. Flawed Terminology Will Not Resolve the Russia-Ukraine Сonflict

    12.03.2019

    Quenching Fire with Gasoline. Flawed Terminology Will Not Resolve the Russia-Ukraine Сonflict
    Since late 2013, Ukraine’s contentious political environment has received many labels: riot, revolution, coup, invasion, civil war. Unfortunately, the use of a particular label often hinges on the user’s political sympathies and affiliations, which does not encourage balanced discussions, writes Ivan Gomza for voxukraine.org. Recently, Jesse Driscoll entered the fray with his policy memo arguing that the Ukraine crisis could/should be described as a “civil war.” Firstly published at PONARS Eurasia. He has two overarching arguments: 1) that events in Ukraine ...
  • Why Accepting Russia’s Terminology Wouldn’t Help Resolve the Russia-Ukraine Сonflict

    21.02.2019

    Why Accepting Russia's Terminology Wouldn't Help Resolve the Russia-Ukraine Сonflict
    Five years after Euromaidan and the “Russian spring” in Ukraine, Russian narratives about the “civil war in Ukraine” have become salient in the media again, writes Tymofii Brik for VoxUkraine. On February 12, the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) held a meeting called by Russia to discuss the progress of the Minsk Agreements. The meeting was dedicated to the fourth anniversary of the Minsk Agreements, although the Ukrainian side argued that the real purpose to call it was to distract attention ...
  • The West must learn from Ukraine’s experience of dealing with Russian provocateurs

    08.02.2019

    The West must learn from Ukraine’s experience of dealing with Russian provocateurs
    “Only a fool learns from his own mistakes. The wise man learns from the mistakes of others”, goes a famous line from Otto von Bismarckm writes Jamila Mammadova for CAPX. As the Paris protests have recently exposed, European societies currently face a twin threat – the inability of their own elites to deal with internal crises and external agents using those same crises to stoke unrest. Ukraine’s Security Service (SBU) has claimed that the Russian secret service has trained the “radicals” ...
  • Trip to parallel realities with Newsweek journalist reporting on Ukraine

    29.01.2019

    Trip to parallel realities with Newsweek journalist reporting on Ukraine
    Before the New Year, in the American magazine Newsweek, journalist Jason Lemon scared readers with Bandera, Petliura and the blossoming of ultra-nationalism in Ukraine, writes MediaSapiens. Jason Lemon is a journalist at the American magazine Newsweek. Previously, he wrote for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution on topics of health, science and the environment. But now, Mr. Lemon writes about politics in the “World” section of Newsweek. On December 27, he published a text titled “Ukraine Makes Birthday of Nazi Collaborator a National Holiday and Bans Book Critical of Anti-Semitic Leader“. Instead of an objective ...

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