Tribune

  • Lenin in Kyiv, Colston in Bristol

    28.06.2020

    Lenin in Kyiv, Colston in Bristol
    Watching the toppling of Bristol’s Edward Colston monument, I was struck by echoes of the fate of another dubious statue: Kyiv’s Lenin monument. The Bolshevik leader was pulled down in 2013 amid anti-government protests sparked first by the decision to cancel an EU trade deal in favor of closer ties to Russia, but later by police brutality against demonstrators. As with Colston, the toppling of Lenin was inspired by violence from above, but also provided a focal point for larger ...
  • For too long Ukrainian history was written by others – Motyl

    26.05.2020

    For too long Ukrainian history was written by others - Motyl
    Dr. Alexander Motyl is a professor of political science at Rutgers-Newark Unversity. A specialist on Ukraine, Russia, and the USSR answered the questions in the interview for uainfocus.org. What is your view on the institutionalization of historical revisionism aimed at political rehabilitation and heroization of the OUN and the UPA? Do you see substantial risks for Ukraine’s image abroad and political stability inside the country? The mainstream view in Ukraine and elsewhere of the OUN/UPA was never crafted by Ukrainians. Rather, the ...
  • Russian Crimea Foreign Affair

    26.04.2020

    Russian Crimea Foreign Affair
    The majority of Crimeans are still glad for their annexation, write John O’loughlin, a professor of political geography at Boulder, Gerard Toal, a professor of government and international affairs at Virginia Tech, and Kristin M. Bakke, a professor of political science and international relations at University College London for foreignaffairs.com. Well, let’s dive in. Six years ago, Russian forces seized the Ukrainian territory of Crimea. Moscow hastily organized a referendum on March 16, 2014, to give the takeover of the peninsula ...
  • The EU designated the revived Ukraine–Belarus–Poland water route as a part of its Eastern Partnership program

    01.03.2020

    The EU designated the revived Ukraine–Belarus–Poland water route as a part of its Eastern Partnership program
    During the Middle Ages, the waterways linking the Baltic and the Black seas were a far more important trade corridor than any land routes linking Europe with what was to become Russia. Twenty years ago, following the collapse of the Soviet Union, the European Union called for developing this older route to handle modern barge traffic via Ukraine, Belarus and Poland, writes Paul Goble for jamestown.org. Those plans were celebrated in stamps jointly issued by Ukraine and Estonia in 2003; ...
  • Lies are part of the DNA of modern society

    28.01.2020

    Lies are part of the DNA of modern society
    If I wrote “The first sentence in this article is a lie”, is this sentence true, or is it a lie? And, if a liar declares “I am lying”, is the liar telling the truth? In philosophy and logic this is known as the Liar’s Paradox: the liar is a liar, and if the liar is indeed lying, then the liar is telling the truth, which means the liar just lied, writes Vittorio Bufacchi for theconversation.com. Lies are part of the DNA ...
  • Russia: Twenty Years of Distorting the Media

    10.01.2020

    Russia: Twenty Years of Distorting the Media
    This week’s disinformation cases reflect a culture of resentment that has become an established trend in the loyal pro-Kremlin media over the last decade, writes euvsdisinfo.eu. The Russian word обида – “obida” – umbrage, resentment, pouting, holding a grudge – has become a core element in shaping public attitudes by the state media’s spin doctors. The Russian writer Andrey Arkhangelsky, featured earlier on our website,  writes in an essay (in Russian) how the Kremlin deliberately fosters resentment. For example, the Kremlin is preparing for the 75th ...
  • Liar Liar. Leonid Bershidsky keeps writing about Ukraine in his opinion pieces for Bloomberg

    04.01.2020

    Liar Liar. Leonid Bershidsky keeps writing about Ukraine in his opinion pieces for Bloomberg
    To many Americans, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy is merely a character in the U.S. impeachment drama, an awkward English speaker from a remote, corrupt country that would be eaten up by Russia if not for U.S. assistance, writes Russian journalist Leonid Bershidsky for Bloomberg. His opinion piece starts with the Russian spelling of the Ukrainian President surname and Russian propaganda narrative about “remote, corrupt country.” He also speculates that Russia would have eaten Ukraine without U.S. assistance, trying to ...
  • The list of 106 Suspicious Russia-related Deaths since 2014

    03.01.2020

    The list of 106 Suspicious Russia-related Deaths since 2014
    With the news that Russian President Vladimir Putin has passed a law classifying journalists, bloggers and even social media users as ‘foreign agents’, Russia analyst Sarah Hurst has been keeping track of those paying the ultimate price. Critics of Vladimir Putin highlighted in red: Dmitri Obretetsky, 49 (November 30, 2019) – Russian businessman knocked down by a car near his home in Oxshott, Surrey.  Nikita Isayev, 41 (November 16, 2019) – Politician, economist and journalist, died suddenly on a train returning from Moscow ...
  • BBC standards are extremely destructive in the fight against Russian propaganda

    31.12.2019

    BBC standards are extremely destructive in the fight against Russian propaganda
    If we give facts and misinformation equal coverage, people will see only grossly distorted reality, said Evgen Tsybulenko, professor of International Law and lecturer at the Tallinn Technical University, in the interview with mnews.world. “I will say a very unpopular thing: in the fight against Russian misinformation, the so-called ‘BBC standards’ not only do not work but are extremely destructive. It’s good to look for the ‘truth in the middle’ if we have two normal opinions. But if we provide equal ...
  • It’s Time to Treat Hammer and Sickle Like Swastika

    18.12.2019

    It's Time to Treat Hammer and Sickle Like Swastika
    If someone were to ask you to think of either extreme of the political spectrum, odds are you would immediately picture a swastika at one end, and a hammer and sickle at the other. Regardless of your views of the left-right paradigm, or whether you subscribe to horseshoe theory or not, we tend to perceive fascism and communism as the standard ideologies of the extreme, writes Richard Mason for intellectualtakeout.org. As such, many of us would also feel rather uneasy ...

The views expressed in “Tribune” section are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Ukrainian Tribune